blog category

Residential Property Sales In Maryland: Understanding Latent Defects

In a residential real estate transaction, both buyer and seller face some degree of risk. The buyer, or course, may be concerned that the home they’re buying has defects of which they’re unaware. Maryland law does require sellers to disclose known defects, and, after a sale, homeowners who discover undisclosed defects may try to hold the seller accountable through legal means. Before buying or selling a home, it’s important for both seller and buyer to understand their rights. In this two-part blog, we’ll look at the legalities of disclosing defects. Defining Latent Defects Section 10-702 of Maryland’s Real Property Article defines latent defects as those that: A buyer would not reasonably be expected to ascertain or observe by a careful visual inspection, and Would pose a direct threat to the health or safety of the purchaser, or any occupant of the property (such as a tenant or houseguest of the purchaser). This…

Part 2 – MHIC Complaints: What Contractors Need to Know

When a homeowner files a complaint about your work, the Maryland Home Improvement Commission could suspend your license and require you to pay thousands of dollars in fines. According to Consumer Reports, most home remodeling complaints are the result of “miscommunication and mismatched expectations.” The best way to avoid being the subject of a complaint is to focus on communication and ensure that your contract clearly states the scope of a project. Protect Your Interests You may already know that once a homeowner signs your contract, you can legally collect your deposit (which can be no more than a third of the total project cost). But Maryland law does not specify how and when you will be paid for the rest of the job. To ensure you are paid in a timely manner, put in writing your expectations about payment, including any penalties for late payment or non-payment. In the unlikely event you…